My very first race

It was 2003 and I’d never run any kind of race before.  I was doing my internship to finish up my degree and thought it would be fun to join everyone else in the gym in this “Main Street Mile”.  It was only 1 mile so what do I have to train for?  The day of the race they placed us in chorales based on speed.  I’m fast, I knew I could run at a good pace so I made my way to the front.  MAJOR mistake!  The gun went off and we all started to run.  I of course wanted to keep up so I started FAST.  Well, by 1/4 miles into the run I was gassed.  Everyone started to pass me real quick and I had to talk my way through the rest of the race.  I had no idea a mile felt that long when you sprinted the first 1/4.   I did complete the race in 7:24 but it took me the entire rest of the day to recover.  And I probably could have done so much better if I knew to pace myself.

How many times have you busted your butt to complete something, then looked back and realized there was an easier way?  Clearly, the least I should have done was practice running one mile properly.  I think we all underestimate the importance of preparing ourselves for the tasks we have ahead.  We need to prepare mentally and physically.  How can we do this?  We have to establish a plan.  I could have easily asked a seasoned runner their advice on what I should have done to complete that mile (comfortably…)  Don’t let you ego get in the way of asking someone for help.  It will help you get through the task so much better and more prepared so you don’t end up killing yourself to get it done.  So whether it is a fitness goal, nutrition goal, occupational goal, etc seek out someone who has completed that particular task before or a professional in the industry.  You may learn quite a few things from their experiences that will save you time, money, or just physical stress.

Daily Routine…

We all know that it is not easy to break a bad habit.  It’s uncomfortable.  We find ourselves in this routine that is easy to flow through, but is it?  I love sleep and getting up early has always been tough for me to discipline myself to do if I don’t have to be anywhere.   But making sure I have enough time to prepare my day is important.  I don’t like to rush myself out the door, but for years I’ve always had early training clients or classes to teach so it made it difficult to wake up early enough to set my day up.  Fortunately I’ve been able to adjust my days so that I give myself that one hour to prepare, do a devotion, and set up my task list.  We talked about routine yesterday with your fitness and it is also important with how you organize your day so you become most efficient.  If my days are not consistent, I will not get as much done as needed.  Yes things come up later in the day so the hour at the beginning when I get up is my most important hour.  It basically determines my mood for the day too.  If you don’t have it already, give yourself one hour to set up and see how much better the rest of your day becomes.  🙂

Dealing with the fizzle

We have all been there at the peak of our decisions.  We are all excited and motivated to start working out and eating healthy.  Week one we roll into our workout with this new found determination that helps us get out of bed.  After week one we are super sore, but still plugging through because you have been challenged (and you refuse to back down and look like a punk).  Halfway through your 30 day challenge, you start hearing voices in your head….

“you deserve a break, you have worked so hard these past two weeks.”

“You’ve already missed Monday, so just start over next week.”

“You didn’t have time to get to the grocery store this weekend so just eat what you have in the house and you can get all the fruits and veggies tomorrow.”

Did you know all these “excuses” push your goals back further and further away?  I know it is hard to change your habits because it takes consistency.  It also requires you to think (or rewire your thinking).  We typically have a pattern of the way we do things everyday.  Changing habits require us to change our patterns.  It takes practice, but it can be done.  It starts with your brain.  If we “assume” that exercise is part of our everyday routine than it will get done.  If you give yourself the option, it most likely will be brushed off to the side because it messes with your “routine”.

Think of your new way of living like road construction.  It is a lot of work initially to construct, but once the road is paved it is so much easier to get to where you are going.  Lifestyle change is the “construction” process.  Stick through it and put the work in initially to create and easy journey when it is finished.  Know that the construction phase will be hard, expect it, push through it, and make it to the finish.  Roadblocks will come (no pun intended) but expect those and keep your eyes on the prize.   You got this!

Happy Hump Day!

Carrie

On my mind…

If you have ever started a fitness program, you know that motivation is the key to sticking with it.  Some days are easier than others when it comes to working out.  If your program calls for 3 days a week, be careful.  This can sabotage you in the long run because it allows you for too many “extra” days.   You may find yourself putting off your workouts because you can just “make it up” the next day.  Instead, aim to exercise daily so that it becomes who you are.  It is so much easier to set aside 30-60 minutes on a daily basis then have a 3 day program that is scattered all over the place.  This also helps it become established as a routine faster.  Results come faster too and we all know that will keep you motivated more than anything else.  So get out there and exercise daily!  It doesn’t matter if is a walk or a full blown boot camp workout in the gym .  Move everyday!

Happy Tuesday!

~Carrie